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Breaking and Entering

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‘Arresting’ is usually – if someone’ s done his or her job well enough – a word associated with “Breaking and Entering”; and there’s no exception here. But whereas, Anthony ‘Cold Mountain’ Minghella’s latest film should cuff you for the duration, stimulating you so much that nobody will want to leave his or her seat for that one phone call, it merely keeps you occupied – like being given a free donut from a copper would.


Jude Law, Martin Freeman, Julliette Binoche, Ray Winstone, Poppy Rogers

‘Arresting’ is usually – if someone’ s done his or her job well enough – a word associated with “Breaking and Entering”; and there’s no exception here. But whereas, Anthony ‘Cold Mountain’ Minghella’s latest film should cuff you for the duration, stimulating you so much that nobody will want to leave his or her seat for that one phone call, it merely keeps you occupied – like being given a free donut from a copper would.

The problem with “Breaking and Entering” is that it’s too analogous – you’d be hard pressed to pick it out of a line-up with films of a similar nature because it fears to tread new territory.

The film stars Minghella-favourite Jude Law (“Cold Mountian”, “The Talented Mr Ripley”) as Will, the part owner of an architect firm in seedy King’s Cross, whose just had all their computers stolen.

Will, fed up after another break-in, chases one of the young gang members, Miro (Rafi Gavron), back to the apartment he shares with his mother Amira (Juliette Binoche), a Bosnian refugee. But instead of informing the mother about her son’s actions, Will – who lives with his beautiful girlfriend Liv (Robin Wright Penn) who spends most of her time worrying about her troubled 13-year-old daughter Bea (Poppy Roger) – decides to get to know Amira (hiring her to be his ‘tailor’), and ultimately, begins a very secret affair with her.

In many respects, “Breaking” is a film that’s only managed to rise above its ‘telemovie-esque script’ by attaching a name (in this case, Jude Law) to the film. Sure, it’s better to have Law in the film than not to have Law in the film, but he is too good for the material. There must’ve been some monetary value for him here, that’s for sure. At the same time, the film also sets-up some interesting support characters (like Vera Farmiga’s hooker character, and Ray Winstone’s copper) but they’re written out of the picture early on, as if Minghella decided not to, at the last minute, give their characters the planned arc he had in mind for them.

On the other hand, it is an entertaining film – and never gets dull. The storyline keeps you interested – even if it doesn’t feel satisfactory resolved by the end – and the performances are especially good.

This 62b’s worth looking into – but don’t bother about calling for back up.

Rating :
Reviewer : Clint Morris

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About Caffeinated Clint

The writer/publicist/producer who wears the editor hat on Moviehole. Favorite films include "Say Anything...", "The Hunt for Red October", "Jerry Maguire", "Almost Famous", "Die Hard", "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo", "Young Guns", "American Psycho", "Back to the Future" and the "Star Wars" series.
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