About quarter way through, it turns into a pretty dramatic ‘[girl] who cried wolf’ drama as it puts the needle down on the ‘sexual abuse’ LP. That whole storyline elbow feels like a little forceful, and it’ll have probably had most hankering for the lighter tone that the film opened with. Yeah, it’s a bit of a mess.


Jane Fonda, Lindsay Lohan, Felicity Huffman, Dermot Mulroney, Cary Elwes, Garrett Hedlund, Hector Elizondo

Rules are meant to be broken, sure, but what a singular Rule – sans plural – as in “Georgia Rule”? Was that always intended to be in dire need of some Tarzan grip, fishing wire and boot polish?

Truth is – and having just witnessed “Because, I said So” less than a week ago; I know just how bad these films can get – the new Lindsay Lohan/Jane Fonda/Felicity Huffman three-hander isn’t that bad. It’s not exactly screaming of ‘must see movie’ merit, but its still reasonable entertainment compared to most babes of the breed.

Jane Fonda’s the grandmother. Felicity Huffman’s the mother. Lindsay Lohan’s the daughter. None of them get along. (Any of this sound familiar yet?). None of them have much to do with each other. When the spoilt and over-sexed Rachel (Lohan, in a role that isn’t much of a stretch; needless to say) is dropped off at her lively but didactic grandmothers (Fonda), she gets a good kick in the pants – and some soap to wash her cursing mouth out with. Ultimately, granny sorts the firecracker out. But what about mum (Huffman)? Can anyone sort her out? And can the three of them ever be close?

Like a lot of these romantic comedies (which is something else I need to discuss…. Later) though, the Garry Marshall (He’ll never top “Pretty Woman” will he?) directed pic feels it deserves a free pass to be sloppy and substandard in the storyline and freshness department just because its not intended for Award Show Ballot forms, when for $15 bucks a pop, it deserves to be informed that it needs to align itself back on the bottom rack for some further cooking.

As pink as some of it is though, “Rule” isn’t as appalling as it could’ve been…. or should’ve been, concerning the mêlée that went on behind-the-scenes with its star.

Remember when a film studio chief threatened to fire Lindsay Lohan from his latest pricey project because the red-headed ex-Disney fave was treating the job about as seriously as a doctor receiving a call from a patient about a chipped nail? Well, this is it. This is the one. This is the film that ‘fire crotch’ didn’t seemingly give two hoots about… and spent every waking moment that she wasn’t filming doing shots with Steve-O and Johnny Knoxville at the Chateau, before dragging herself – usually at whatever hour she pleased – down to the set. Lohan’s – and I’ve gotta say it, the film stock makes her look freckly in this one; just an observation – constantly hung over state should have resulted in a performance ruled by bags under her eyes… but instead, she’s actually done OK here; seemingly pulling it all together when it mattered. (Amazing how a few million dollars can pep someone up when need be). Better though are Jane Fonda and Felicity Huffman, but that’s purely due to experience. All in all, everyone in the film – including supporting players Dermot Mulroney and Cary Elwes – is playing like they’re in a grand final.

The main problem that people will probably have with “Georgia Rule” isn’t the fusty storyline but more so the fact that it’s not the film that most have paid to see. I presuppose anyone purchasing a ticket to the film is expecting to see a wacky three-hander that’ll have the easily amused rolling in the aisles. Unfortunately, that’s not the case. Yes, there’s a couple of amusing moments early in the movie, but then, about quarter way through, it turns into a pretty dramatic ‘[girl] who cried wolf’ drama as it puts the needle down on the ‘sexual abuse’ LP. That whole storyline elbow feels like a little forceful, and it’ll have probably had most hankering for the lighter tone that the film opened with. Yeah, it’s a bit of a mess.

Wait for video.

Rating :
Reviewer : Clint Morris