Band of Brothers cinematographer to direct Angel’s Paradise

mikaelsolomon

King’s Indian Productions and Dogs on the Roof Productions (DOTR) announced today Emmy Award winning director and Academy Award nominated cinematographer, Mikael Salomon is attached to direct the political thriller, ”Angel’s Paradise”’. Salomon has been a director of photography and a director on dozens of films, including ”The Abyss”, ”Hard Rain”, and ”Band of Brothers”, to name a few.

A story based on and inspired by actual events that took place in Central America during the mid-1980’s, ”Angel’s Paradise” is the first feature length script from award-winning author, journalist, photographer and documentary film scribe, Paul VanDevelder. When a wire service reporter is mysteriously tortured and killed during the Salvadoran civil war, a classic ‘who dunnit?’ suddenly becomes an international political thriller as the deceased reporter’s colleagues uncover the leading edges of a notorious international political scandal: the Iran-Contra Affair. The film will be produced by Linus Hume and Peter E. Jackson, co-produced by Meg McWhinney and David Ohnona, and executive produced by Raymond Chavez and Ted Garcia. The film is scheduled to shoot in the summer of 2015 in Puerto Rico.

“We couldn’t be more delighted with Mikael’s decision to join us,” said Meg McWhinney, co-producer and founding member of DOTR, an independent production company. “He brings deep craft, the right temperament, a passion for the story, and a perfect balance of artistic and commercial sensibilities to this project.”

“Paul VanDevelder’s script is not only compelling and exciting, it’s relentless and infuriating,” says Salomon. “The events depicted in this story boggle the mind. When conspiracies of greed and deception reach DEFCON 1, greed and deception magically morph into US foreign policy.”

“There seems to be an unwritten 30 year rule with these things,” notes VanDevelder, who, as a journalist, chronicled many of the events depicted in the story. “ARGO, American Hustle, Charlie Wilson’s War, and others like Kill the Messenger (due out later this year), are finally coming to the silver screen. Big audiences await these stories, and when you take a film like Angel’s to a worldwide audience, the choirboy mythologies about American foreign policy all fall away. Truth suddenly becomes your friend.”