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MacLachlan on Twin Peaks : “It will be clear”

If there’s one complaint you’ll find [some] “Twin Peaks” making of the revival, it’s that they weren’t prepared for Dougie Jones, a waddling renaissance rainman that’s part all-of-us-on-a-bender, part squeaky Tin Man from “The Wizard Oz”, and a smidge of someone’s fiscally-thinking relative after they’ve emerged from a Savers department store. Sure, David Lynch was never going to make it easy for everyone’s favourite Agent to simply ditch the curtains for community, but it’s safe to say we expected he might have given us a little more ‘Coop’ than the past eight episodes have. Sure, Washington’s brighest spark is slowly but surely returning to his old self (please let it not take until the season finale though) but as star Kyle MacLachlan admits, Dougie is starting to test people’s patience – but only because most of us (not me, I’m loving this journey of wonderful and strange) prefer to watch with a ladle.

At the same time, and as I’ve pointed out in previous think pieces, this “Twin Peaks” was never meant to be simply a continuation of the Bush-era classic. If it were a Baldwin brother, the original would be sweet, well-meaning Stephen, and this latest version, the unrestrained, in-your-face and brilliantly perplexing Alec. Gotta love Alec.

“Many people wanted the nostalgic return to Twin Peaks that they remembered,” MacLachlan tells The Hollywood Reporter. “And that’s not what we’re representing here.”

As the actor suggests, nothing in “Twin Peaks” has simply been done just to push the envelope or piss of impatient viewers – every element will come together.

“David’s storytelling is filled with imagery and different perspectives and characters and things that may initially be confusing to people, but ultimately everything will come back together and make sense. It will be clear.”

MacLachlan hints at a bafflingly brilliant journey that’ll fit better than Pamela Lee and floaties by the eighteenth episode.

“…my take on it is that the world is out of balance, and we’re trying to take it back into balance now. We have 18 hours to do that. But I knew it would be difficult for people.”

I think, for many, that’s all they need to hear – that Lynch has a plan, that his story will offer up answers, and that some of the absurder moments of the past eight episodes were scripted for a reason. But did we even assume otherwise?

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