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Goon: Last of the Enforcers

In 2011, a small budget comedy written by actor Jay Baruchel and Seth Rogen’s long-tine partner, Evan Goldberg, called “Goon” attracted itself a small following.  The story of Doug Glatt, a man whose IQ level is so low it leads him to become an enforcer in pro hockey, had its funny moments.  Not sure if anyone was clamoring for a sequel but one has arrived.  And it’s not too bad.

The NHL is on strike, which means more attention is being paid to the minor league teams, including Halifax Highlanders.  Doug (Scott) is now the team’s captain, and each night he leads them onto the ice.  He also leads the team in penalty minutes.  It seems Doug is still a goon – picking a fight with anyone he sees.  However this year things have changed.  There’s a new black-hat in the league, Anders Cain (Russell) who is not only big and bad but is the son of the Highlander’s team owner.  One night out on the ice Doug and Anders throw down, with Doug being seriously injured.  With a new wife and a baby on the way, Doug decides to retire, thinking he can skate away from the game he loves.  But it’s never easy to walk away.

Well cast and smartly written, “Goon: Last of the Enforcers” is built on different relationships.  Doug and his teammates.  Doug and his wife.  Anders and his father.  They all play a part in the story.  And the cast help pull these relationships off.  Scott has always been able to play the dense guy who just doesn’t get it but here he give Doug (or, as he signs his name, “Dug”) a quiet sweetness that keeps you rooting for him.  And as much as you want to hate him, you also quietly root for Anders.  It’s obvious that he’s only playing the game the way he does to earn some recognition from his father, a one-time hockey star.  The violence he dispenses is his way of asking for attention.  I had the opportunity to meet Wyatt Russell last year and he is a pretty good sized guy.  He was also a hockey player (he was a goalie) so I can imagine it was fun for him to be outside the pipes and facing off on the ice.  Schreiber seems to be having fun with his role as former enforcer Ross Rhea who, like Doug, finds himself reliving the old days by participating in local “hockey nights.”  It should be noted that no hockey is played at these events.  It’s just fighting match-ups, with the winner moving on to the next guy.

First-time feature director Baruchel shows a keen eye for keeping the film moving and his cameras have managed to capture the best part of ice hockey – the speed in which the game flows.

If I have a problem with the film it’s with the amount of blood that is shed during the on-ice battles.  Most hockey fights consist of one guy grabbing another guy’s sweater, pulling it up over his head and giving him a few shots to the head.  Those pale in comparison to the violence here, where teeth are lost and gallons of blood are spilled.  Oh, and also TJ. Miller has an unfunny, recurring gig as a “Sportcenter” style host. I wish I knew who in Hollywood he had naked pictures of because I’d steal them back and return them if it meant I never had to endure him again in a film.

Director: Jay Baruchel
Cast:

Seann William Scott, Wyatt Russell and Live Schreiber

Runtime:

1hr 41mins

Summary:

Well cast and smartly written

Rating:
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